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There is no evidence to support or refute the clinical assumption that the use of baby walkers has a negative effect on motor development

Prepared by:

Paula S.C. chagas (MSc, PT)
Email address: pscchagas@ig.com.br

Rachel S.M. Cunha (PT)
Email: rachelzinha_fisio@yahoo.com.br

Maris C. Mancini (ScD, OT)
Email: mcmancini@pib.com.br

Livia C Magalhaes (PhD, OT
Email: liviam@gcsnet.com.br

Doctoral program in Rehabilitation Sciences, Federal University of Minas Gerais State, Brazil

Date:

October 2007

Review Date:

October 2009

Clinical Question:

 What is the effect and use of baby walker on motor development of typically developing children?

Clinical Scenario:

The walker is an item of equipment frequently used during the period before the acquisition of independent gait in typically developing children.  Some parents utilize this equipment because they believe that it helps their children to walk independently.  There is a clinical assumption that the use of baby walkers has negative effects on motor development and some authors warn against the use of baby walkers, because they may be responsible for delaying the acquisition of locomotor milestones in children.  To date,  few studies have investigated the effect and the use of baby walkers on the early onset of independent gait.

Clinical Bottom Line:

       

There is no evidence to support or refute the clinical assumption that the use of baby walkers has a negative effect on motor development

BB

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